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Below are the essential oils that are available in our mix your oil blend! Each one of them plays an important role in the recipe.

Basil Essential Oil

Ocimum basilicum

Basil is an extremely common ingredient in the kitchen, but it’s also a very popular essential oil, and has been for hundreds of years. The plant itself normally grows up to 60cm high, and features dark-green, oval-shaped leaves from which the flowers bud. The chemical makeup of Basil allows for it to be used in a variety of methods, most notably for emotional and nervous support. It is also commonly used to improve respiratory condition as well as circulation and muscle concerns. Basil finds its origins in tropical Asia and Africa, but has also been widely cultivated in Europe, the Mediterranean, Pacific Islands, and North and South America.

Origin: Asia and Africa
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowers and Leaves

Used in:Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Basil was (and is) used in Ayurvedic tradition as a remedy for respiratory conditions like bronchitis, coughs, colds, and asthma, and also as an antidote for poisonous insect and reptile bites. In the West, Basil is considered a “cooling” herb and is used for a variety of pain-relieving effects such as calming rheumatism and irritable skin conditions.

Properties

Antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, cephalic, digestive, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, galactagogue, nervine, prophylactic, restorative, stimulant of adrenal cortex, stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

Basil essential oil is colorless or a pale yellow with a light and fresh overtone, and a mildly sweet-and-spicy undertone. It blends well with many citrus oils like Bergamot, Lime, Lemon, and Lemongrass, as well as “green” oils like hyssop and clary sage.

Safety Information

Basil essential oil is mildly phototoxic, but is virtually non-irritant in almost all cases, although some individuals may experience skin irritations. Avoid use during pregnancy.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Insect bites (mosquito, wasp), insect repellent.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Gout, muscular aches and pains, rheumatism.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Bronchitis, coughs, earache, sinusitis.
  • Digestive System: Dyspepsia, flatulence, nausea.
  • Immune System: Colds, fever, ’flu, infectious disease.
  • Nervous System: Anxiety, depression, fatigue, insomnia, migraine, nervous tension: ‘Oil of Basil is an excellent, indeed perhaps the best, aromatic nerve tonic.

Bergamot Essential Oil

Citrus bergamia

Bergamot is commonly grown in Italy and Northwestern Africa, and is used for a variety of skin and respiratory conditions. In addition, Bergamot can be applied for indigestion, infections, respiratory conditions, and anxiety/depression. Bergamot essential oil can be effective through dermal application, as well as diffusion and aromatics.

Origin: Italy
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Bergamot has been used in Italian folk medicine for many years, and is named after the city of Bergamo. Italians had traditionally used it to curb fever and worms, but its usage has expanded and is now applied for a variety of conditions and symptoms.

Properties

Analgesic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, antiseptic (pulmonary, genito-urinary), antispasmodic, antitoxic, carminative, digestive, diuretic, deodorant, febrifuge, laxative, parasiticide, rubefacient, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Bergamot essential oil appears light green to yellow and has a fresh and citrusy scent, much like other citrus fruit oils. The undertones of the scent are far more reminiscent of woody and earthy tones than the initial overtones, which makes it great to combine with oils like lavender, jasmine, geranium, lemon, and chamomile.

Safety information

Some of the constituents of Bergamot can be phototoxic, meaning they can cause for irritation or sensitivity of your skin when it comes in contact with sunlight. Consumers should be careful to use limited quantities when applying Bergamot dermally, and should contact a physician prior to use if they have any questions or concerns regarding their own experience.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Can be used to combat a variety of skin conditions including acne and insect bites.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Can assist in relieving a sore throat or symptoms of tonsillitis.
  • Digestive Issues: Can limit flatulence and can increase appetite.
  • Immune System: Can help to boost the immune system in fighting colds, fever, flu, and other infections.
  • Nervous System: Commonly applied to help ease anxiety, depression, and stress as well as uplift mood and mental stimulation.

Bitter Orange Essential Oil

Citrus aurantium var. amara

Bitter Orange is an very common tropical plant that flowers similarly to the Sweet Orange tree, however, the fruit itself is smaller and darker than the Sweet Orange. It is well-known to have a strong resistance to agricultural diseases and is often used to bolster the root systems of other citrus trees. Bitter Orange trees grow all over the world in tropical climates, but they originated in the Far East. Due to its complex chemical constituency, Bitter Orange can be used for a variety of conditions, and is a popular additive to many different illness remedies.

Origin: Far East
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowers and Leaves

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

In traditional Eastern Medicines, dried Bitter Orange was used as a digestive and to assist with bodily was excretion, as well as a high-source of vitamin C to assist with conditions like scurvy, jaundice, and sepsis.

Properties

Antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, bactericidal, carminative, choleretic, digestive, fungicidal, hypotensive, sedative (nervous), stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A dark yellow or brownish-yellow mobile liquid with a fresh, dry, almost floral odour with a rich, sweet undertone.

Safety information

Phototoxic; otherwise generally non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. Limonene has been reported to cause contact dermatitis in some individuals.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Mouth sores, mouth ulcers, and skin complexity and oil issues.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Bronchitis, chills.
  • Digestive System: Constipation, dyspepsia, spasm.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension and stress-related conditions.

Black Pepper Essential Oil

Piper nigrum

Black Pepper is actually the fruit of a perennial woody vine that grows to nearly 5 meters in high and has heart-shaped leaves and small white flowers. The fruit grows first in a red color and as it matures it turns darker until, eventually, it is the black, pebble-sized fruit we know as Black Pepper. Originally sourced from southwest India, it is now cultivated in tropical countries with the major producers being India, Indonesia, China, and Madagascar. Black Pepper is commonly used in the kitchen, but its constituents make for a great remedy in many areas, especially in muscle aches and digestive issues.

Origin: India
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Peppercorns

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Black Pepper has been used in the East for over 4000 years for medicinal and culinary purposes including use in monasteries for endurance and muscle and joint pain.

Properties

Analgesic, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, aperitif, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, febrifuge, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant (nervous, circulatory, digestive), stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A water-white to pale olive mobile liquid with a fresh, dry-woody, warm, spicy scent. It blends well with frankincense, sandalwood, lavender, rosemary, and marjoram.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-sensitizing, irritant in high concentration due to rubefacient properties. Use in moderation only.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Anaemia, arthritis, muscular aches and pains, neuralgia, poor circulation, poor muscle tone (muscular atonia), rheumatic pain, sprains, stiffness.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Chills.
  • Digestive System: Colic, constipation, diarrhoea, flatulence, heartburn, loss of appetite, nausea.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu, infections and viruses.

Cinnamon Leaf Essential Oil

Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Cinnamon comes from a tropical evergreen tree that grows as high as 15 meters with strong branches, thick bark, and shiny-green leathery leaves. It produces white flowers and oval-shaped blue berries. Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka, South India, Madagascar, and Indochina, and is used for a myriad of ailments, mostly related to fighting infections, rheumatism, and stomach issues.

Origin: India and Southern Asia
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

It has been used for thousands of years in the east for a wide range of complaints including colds, ’flu, digestive and menstrual problems, rheumatism, kidney troubles and as a general stimulant.

Properties

Anthelmintic, antidiarrhoeal, antidote (to poison), antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-putrescent, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, haemostatic, orexigenic, parasiticide, refrigerant, spasmolytic, stimulant (circulatory, cardiac, respiratory), stomachic, and vermifuge.

Characteristics

A yellow to brownish liquid with a warm-spicy, somewhat harsh odor.

Safety information

The leaf oil is relatively non-toxic, though possibly irritant due to cinnamaldehyde. Its major component, eugenol, causes irritation to the mucous membranes: use in moderation.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Lice, scabies, tooth and gum care, warts, wasp stings.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Poor circulation, rheumatism.
  • Digestive System: Anorexia, colitis, diarrhoea, dyspepsia, intestinal infection, sluggish digestion, spasm.
  • Immune System: Chills, colds, ’flu, infectious diseases.
  • Nervous System: Debility, nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions.

Clary Sage Essential Oil

Salvia sclarea

Clary Sage is a large perennial herb that grows up to a meter high with large and hairy leaves. The leaves grow with a greenish-purple hue and it sprouts small blue flowers. Clary Sage is native to Europe, but now grows extensively around the world, particularly in the Mediterranean region. Clary Sage is used frequently to assist with things like digestive issues, menstruation, depression, anxiety, muscle and joint pain, and on the skin.

Origin: Southern Europe
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves and Flowers

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

It was used for digestive disorders, kidney disease, uterine and menstrual complaints, for cleansing ulcers and as a general nerve tonic.

Properties

Anthelmintic, antidiarrhoeal, antidote (to poison), antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-putrescent, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, haemostatic, orexigenic, parasiticide, refrigerant, spasmolytic, stimulant (circulatory, cardiac, respiratory), stomachic, and vermifuge.

Characteristics

A colourless or pale yellowy-green liquid with a sweet, nutty-herbaceous scent. It blends well with juniper, lavender, coriander, cardomon, geranium, sandalwood, cedarwood, pine, labdanum, jasmine, frankincense, bergamot and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Avoid during pregnancy. Do not use clary sage oil while drinking alcohol since it can induce a narcotic effect and exaggerate drunkenness. Clary sage is generally used in preference to the garden sage in aromatherapy due to its lower toxicity level.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, boils, dandruff, hair loss, inflamed conditions, oily skin and hair, ophthalmia, ulcers, wrinkles.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: High blood pressure, muscular aches and pains.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, throat infections, whooping cough.
  • Digestive System: Colic, cramp, dyspepsia, flatulence.
  • Nervous System: Depression, frigidity, impotence, migraine, nervous tension and stress-related disorders.

Copaiba Essential Oil

Copaifera officinalis

Copaiba is is actually known as Copaiba Balsam, and is a wild-growing tropical tree with thick foliage and many branches. Although it is not a ‘true’ balsam, its natural oleoresin does occur as a physiological product from several similar species. Copaiba is native to northeast and central South America, particularly Brazil and Venezuela where it has been used for centuries for a variety of reasons.

Origin: North and Central South America
Method: Tree Tapping
Plant Part: Bark and Trunk

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Used for centuries in Europe in the treatment of chronic cystitis and bronchitis; also for treating piles, chronic diarrhoea and intestinal problems.

Properties

Bactericidal, balsamic, disinfectant, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant.

Characteristics

The oil is a pale yellow or greenish mobile liquid with a mild, sweet, balsamic-peppery odour. It blends well with cananga, ylang ylang, vanilla, jasmine, violet and other florals.

Safety information

Relatively non-toxic, non-irritant, possible sensitization. Large doses cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Respiratory Conditions: Bronchitis, chills, colds, coughs, etc.
  • Digestive System: Intestinal infections, piles.
  • Nervous System: Stress-related conditions like depression and anxiety.

Dill Seed Essential Oil

Anethum graveolens

Dill is an annual or biennial herb that grows up to 1 meter high with a smooth stem, feathery leaves, and groups of yellowish flowers that are filled with small flat seeds. It is native to the Mediterranean region, and is now cultivated worldwide, mainly in Europe and the United States. Medicinally, it is used often as a digestive aid.

Origin: Mediterranean Region
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Seeds

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Used since the earliest times as a medicinal and culinary herb. In Germany and Scandinavia especially, it is used with fish and cucumber, and the seeds baked in bread. In the west and east it is used as a soothing digestive aid for indigestion, wind, colic etc. especially in children.

Properties

Antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, galactagogue, hypotensive, stimulant, stomachic.

Characteristics

A colourless to pale yellow mobile liquid with a light fresh warm-spicy scent.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Digestive System: Colic, dyspepsia, flatulence, indigestion.

Eucalyptus Essential Oil

Eucalyptus globulus

Eucalyptus trees are of the most abundant species on the planet, with nearly 700 distinct species around the world. The most common version of the essential oil, containing larger quantities of cineol, can be applied for a variety of symptoms including fever and skin irritation, in addition to joint and muscle pain relief. The natural “warming, then cooling” properties of the oil make it a nice addition to massage oils and lotions, but it can also be used in a diffuser when focusing on respiratory or sinus symptoms.

Origin: Australia
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

As a traditional household remedy in Australia, Eucalyptus was often used for respiratory ailments like bronchitis and asthma, as well as skin and muscle ailments - which quickly made its way into Western Medicine practice and has been employed as such ever since.

Properties

Analgesic, antineuralgic, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, balsamic, cicatrisant, decongestant, deodorant, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, hypoglycaemic, parasiticide, prophylactic, rubefacient, stimulant, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Eucalyptus essential oil is colorless liquid that yellows slightly as it ages with a camphorous (highly concentrated minty) overtone and woody, yet sweet, undertone. It makes a great addition to many other oils including rosemary, lavender, marjoram, and lemon.

Safety information

Eucalyptus oil is virtually non-irritant (excluding cases of allergy) when applied externally or when diluted in a diffuser. Eucalyptus oil should NOT be used undiluted, and should NEVER be swallowed or consumed orally, even in small volumes.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Applied often for burns, cuts, and blisters, as well as insect bites and skin infections
  • Muscle and Joint Care: Used in lotions and massage oils to reduce muscle and joint pain from arthritis or exertion.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Commonly used externally to relieve symptoms of chest colds and bronchitis, as well as asthma and sinusitis.
  • Immune System: Can interrupt symptoms of cold and ‘flu

Frankincense Essential Oil

Boswellia carteri

Frankincense is arguably the most powerful essential oil on Earth, and although that claim is subjective, it really is an amazing natural substance that anyone can benefit from. Frankincense is harvested from the oleoresin that leaks from incisions in the bark of the Boswellia tree. Native to Northern and Eastern Africa, the Boswellia’s oleoresin is harvested and from there transported to regions like Europe and India to be distilled into essential oil.

Origin: Northern Africa
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Oleoresin

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Used since antiquity as an incense in India, China and in the west by the Catholic Church. In ancient Egypt it was used in rejuvenating face masks, cosmetics and perfumes. It has been used medicinally in the east and west for a wide range of conditions including syphilis, rheumatism, respiratory and urinary tract infections, skin diseases, as well as digestive and nervous complaints.

Properties

Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, sedative, tonic, uterine, vulnerary.

Characteristics

A pale yellow or greenish mobile liquid with a fresh, terpeney top note and a warm, rich, sweet-balsamic undertone. It blends well with sandalwood, pine, vetiver, geranium, lavender, mimosa, neroli, orange, bergamot, camphor, basil, pepper, cinnamon and other spices. It modifies the sweetness of citrus blends in an intriguing way.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Blemishes, dry and mature complexions, scars, wounds, wrinkles.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, coughs, laryngitis.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Anxiety, nervous tension and stress-related conditions

Geranium Essential Oil

Pelargonium graveolens

Geranium is a perennial shrub with fuzzy stems and pointed leaves, serrated at the edges with budding pink flowers. Due to the chemical constituency of Geranium, the entire plant is extremely aromatic. It is native to South Africa, but is now widely cultivated throughout the world. History tells us that Geranium has been used for thousands of years in herbal medicine, being used for several conditions related to blood condition and digestion.

Origin: South Africa
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves, Stalks, and Flowers

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Used for conditions such as dysentery, haemorrhoids, inflammations, metrorrhagia and menorrhagia (excessive blood loss during menstruation). The root and herb of cranesbill is specifically indicated in the British Herbal Pharmacopoeia for diarrhoea and peptic ulcer.

Properties

Antidepressant, antihaemorrhagic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, cicatrisant, deodorant, diuretic, fungicidal, haemostatic, stimulant (adrenal cortex), styptic, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

The Bourbon oil is a greenish-olive liquid with a green, rosy-sweet, minty scent. The Bourbon oil is generally preferred in perfumery work; it blends well with lavender, patchouli, clove, rose, sandalwood, jasmine, juniper, neroli, bergamot and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, generally non-sensitizing; possible contact dermatitis in hypersensitive individuals, especially with the Bourbon type.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, bruises, broken capillaries, burns, congested skin, cuts, dermatitis, eczema, haemorrhoids, lice, oily complexion, mature skin, mosquito repellent, ringworm, ulcers, wounds.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Cellulitis, engorgement of breasts, oedema, poor circulation.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Sore throat, tonsillitis.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension, neuralgia and stress-related conditions.

Ginger Essential Oil

Zingiber officinale

Ginger is an herb, native to southern Asia, that has a very thick tuberous root that serves as the subject of harvesting and agricultural purpose for the plant. Ginger is very, very common in the kitchen, used often as a spice in Eastern dishes, however, it is also widely used for its natural medicinal properties.

Origin: Southern and Eastern Asia
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Roots

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Fresh ginger is used in China for many complaints including rheumatism, bacterial dysentery, toothache, malaria, and for cold and moist conditions such as excess mucus and diarrhoea. It is best known as a digestive aid, especially in the West.

Properties

Analgesic, anti-oxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, aperitif, aphrodisiac, bactericidal, carminative, cephalic, diaphoretic, expectorant, febrifuge, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant, stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A pale yellow, amber or greenish liquid with a warm, slightly green, fresh, woody-spicy scent. It blends well with sandalwood, vetiver, patchouli, frankincense, rosewood, cedarwood, coriander, rose, lime, neroli, orange and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant (except in high concentration), slightly phototoxic; may cause sensitization in some individuals.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, fatigue, muscular aches and pains, poor circulation, rheumatism, sprains, strains etc.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Catarrh, congestion, coughs, sinusitis, sore throat.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension, neuralgia and stress-related conditions.

Hyssop Essential Oil

Hyssopus officinalis

Hyssop is a perennial, nearly evergreen, shrub that grows up to 60cms high and has woody stems and small, pointed leaves and purple-blue flowers. It’s native to the Mediterranean region and in temperate Asia, but now grows wild throughout the Americas, Russia, and Europe. Often, it is used for respiratory and digestive issues, but can be used externally for arthritis, and aromatically for anxiety or hysteria.

Origin: Mediterranean Region and temperate Asia
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves and Flowers

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

H. officinalis has an ancient medical reputation and was used for purifying sacred places, and employed as a strewing herb. It is used principally for respiratory and digestive complaints, and externally for rheumatism,bruises, sores, earache and toothache. It is also used to regulate the blood pressure, as a general nerve tonic, and for states of anxiety or hysteria. It is current in the British Herbal Pharmacopoeia as a specific for bronchitis and the common cold.

Properties

Astringent, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, bactericidal, carminative, cephalic, cicatrisant, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hypertensive, nervine, sedative, sudorific, tonic (heart and circulation), vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

A colourless to pale yellowy-green liquid with a sweet, camphoraceous top note and warm spicy-herbaceous undertone. It blends well with lavender, rosemary, myrtle, bay leaf, sage, clary sage, geranium and citrus oils.

Safety information

Non-irritant, non-sensitizing; the oil is moderately toxic due to the pinocamphone content. It should be used only in moderation and avoided in pregnancy and by epileptics.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Bruises, cuts, dermatitis, eczema, inflammation, wounds.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, fatigue, muscular aches and pains, poor circulation, rheumatism, sprains, strains etc.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Catarrh, congestion, coughs, sinusitis, sore throat.
  • Digestive System: Colic, indigestion.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension, neuralgia and stress-related conditions.

Lavender Essential Oil

Lavendula officinalis

Lavender essential oil is arguably the most widely used and recognizable essential oil on the planet and has been used for hundreds (purportedly, thousands) of years in a variety of methods for physical and nervous system ailments alike. More often than not, the public associates Lavender essential oil with its soothing and welcoming scent, but it also has roots in the culinary world, as well as cosmetics. If you’re a novice essential oil user, Lavender essential oil is a wonderful gateway into the realm of aromatherapy.

Origin: Bulgaria
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowering Tops

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Lavender has been used in folk tradition for a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from stomach pain and muscle spasms to debilitating nervous disorders and hysteria.

Properties

Analgesic, anticonvulsive, antidepressant, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, carminative, cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, deodorant, diuretic, emmenagogue, hypotensive, insecticide, nervine, parasiticide, rubefacient, sedative, stimulant, sudorific, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Lavender essential oil ranges from completely clear/pale to yellow with a sweet and floral overtone, matched with an equally soothing and inviting woody and earthy undertone. Lavender essential oil is very versatile and blends extremely well with many oils including just about every citrus or floral oil, clary sage, geranium, and patchouli.

Safety information

Lavender essential oil is non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing in nearly all consumers, with exceptions for people with allergies to Lavender.

Therapeutic Uses

Lavender is widely regarded as the most versatile essential oil for aromatherapy - its uses are abundant. Skin Care: Lavender is frequently employed to address skin conditions like acne, athlete’s foot, boils, bruises, burns, dandruff, dermatitis, sunburn, and insect bites and stings.

  • Muscle and Joint Care: Useful for combating the pain associated with muscle aches, rheumatism, and sprains.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Lavender can be helpful in relieving the symptoms of asthma, bronchitis, laryngitis, throat infections, and whooping cough.
  • Digestive Issues: Can help to ease the stress on your digestive tract caused by abdominal cramps, flatulence, and nausea.
  • Immune System: Used often as a remedy for head colds and ‘flu’s
  • Nervous System: Lavender essential oil is wonderful at curbing the symptoms of depression, headache, hypertension, insomnia, migraine, nervous tension, and stress-related conditions.

Lemon Essential Oil

Citrus limon

The Lemon is one of the most widely recognizable citrus fruits in the world, with its notable yellow color and oblong shape, the sharp and sour juice and peel are applied commonly for a variety of conditions. Lemons can be found growing across the world, although its origins are in Asia, likely East India. The primary locations for cultivation today are in the Mediterranean region and South and North America. When life hands you lemons, you don’t just make lemonade, you use it for all of its amazing properties, too!

Origin: Italy
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Tranquil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Lemon peel has been used in folk tradition and the culinary world as a flavoring for hundreds of years. Upon the discovery of its vast nutritional attributes (high content of Vitamins A, B, and C) it became even more popular and was used as a sort-of “cure-all” for symptoms of infection like fever or scurvy. When taken internally, Lemon juice is very effective in addressing acidic conditions like arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Properties

Anti-anaemic, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antisclerotic, antiscorbutic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic, febrifuge, haemostatic, hypotensive, insecticidal, rubefacient, stimulates white corpuscles, tonic, vermifuge.

Characteristics

Lemon essential oil begins as a pale green-yellow liquid, and begins to brown with aging. It has a very light, sharp, and citrus scent - making it perfect for blending with oils like Lavender, Ylang Ylang, Rose, Sandalwood, Chamomile, Geranium, Eucalyptus, and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Internally, Lemon essential oil is non-toxic. However, external use can lead to sensitivities and Lemon essential oil is phototoxic, so it should not be applied dermally in areas that will be exposed to direct sunlight.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Can be used or applied to the skin (in low volumes, and in a carrier oil) to address symptoms of acne, anaemia, brittle nails, boils, cuts, greasy skin, insect bites, mouth ulcers, spots, varicose veins, and warts.
  • Muscle and Joint Care: Lemon essential oil is often used by people looking to relieve pain from arthritis, nosebleeds, obesity, poor circulation, and rheumatism.

Lemongrass Essential Oil

Cymbopogon flexuosus

Lemongrass comes from a vast Genus of plants that span much of India and the West Indies, all of which can be labeled Lemongrass. The plant itself is fast-growing and very trying on its environment, wicking much of the nutrition from the soil around it leaving the soil exhausted of its resources. It can grow to nearly 1.5 meters high and produces an equally large network of roots. Its flavor is similar to that of Lemon, hence the name, and the essential oil is a yellow or amber color with a scent similar to that of Lemon essential oil, however leaning closer to the side of earthiness and flowery than primarily citrus. Lemongrass is commonly employed to address the symptoms of colds, muscle pain, fever, and headache.

Origin: India
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Plant

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Lemongrass has been employed in traditional Indian culture and medicine for generations, and in medicine is usually used to curb fever and other infectious illnesses.

Properties

Analgesic, antidepressant, antimicrobial, anti-oxidant, antipyretic, antiseptic, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, deodorant, febrifuge, fungicidal, galactagogue, insecticidal, nervine, sedative (nervous), tonic.

Characteristics

East Indian Lemongrass essential oil has a yellow or amber appearance with fresh grassy and lemony scent, it is generally lighter in odor and color than West Indian Lemongrass. Lemongrass blends well with Lavender, Clary Sage, Ylang Ylang, and other citrusy oils.

Safety information

Lemongrass is non-toxic, although there are possible dermal sensitivities for some individuals - use with care.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Lemongrass essential oil can have an effect on acne, athlete’s foot, excessive perspiration, and other skin inconsistencies.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Applied dermally in a massage oil for muscle pain, joint stiffness, poor circulation, and muscle tone.
  • Digestive Issues: Can be useful in dealing with colitis, indigestion, and gastroenteritis.
  • Immune System: Has been used to combat fever and other infectious disease.
  • Nervous System: Can ease pain caused by headaches and hypertension, and can relieve nervous exhaustion and other stress-related conditions.

Lime Peel Essential Oil

Citrus aurantifolia

Lime Peel essential oil comes from cold-pressing the Lime, which originates from Southern Asia and has been naturalized into many tropical areas around the world. The fruit grows on a tree that stretches up to 4.5 meters high and grows dark-green leaves and thick branches, with small white flowers that eventually pollinate into the fruit. The Lime has often been used indiscriminately and interchangeably with the Lemon, as they share a nearly identical chemical constituency.

Origin: South Asia and the Pacific Islands
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

It is used for similar purposes including fever, infections, sore throat, colds, etc. It used to be used as a remedy for dyspepsia with glycerin of pepsin.

Properties

Antirheumatic, antiscorbutic, antiseptic, antiviral, aperitif, bactericidal, febrifuge, restorative, tonic.

Characteristics

A pale yellow or olive-green liquid with a fresh, sweet, citrus-peel odor.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. However, the expressed ‘peel’ oil is phototoxic (but not the steam-distilled ‘whole fruit’ oil).

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, anaemia, brittle nails, boils, chilblains, corns, cuts, greasy skin, herpes, insect bites, mouth ulcers, spots, varicose veins, warts.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, cellulitis, high blood pressure, nosebleeds, obesity (congestion), poor circulation, rheumatism
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, throat infections, bronchitis, catarrh.
  • Digestive System: Dyspepsia.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu, fever and infections.

Mandarin Essential Oil

Citrus reticulata

Mandarin oranges have an interesting history that contributes to much of their current notoriety. Native to southern China and the Far East, Mandarin oranges were brought to Europe in 1805 and to America forty years later, where they were renamed the tangerine. The Mandarin is produced mainly in Italy, Spain, Algeria, Cyprus, Greece, the Middle East and Brazil; the tangerine in Texas, Florida, California and Guinea. They are widely used in ancient medicinal practice, and contain many of the same chemical properties as a variety of other citrus fruits.

Origin: Far-Eastern Asia and China
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

The name comes from the fruit which was a traditional gift to the Mandarins of China. In France it is regarded as a safe children’s remedy for indigestion, hiccoughs, etc, and also for the elderly since it helps strengthen the digestive function and liver.

Properties

Antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, digestive, diuretic (mild), laxative (mild), sedative, stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), tonic.

Characteristics

Mandarin oil is a yellowy-orange mobile liquid with a blue-violet hint, having an intensely sweet, almost floral citrus scent. It blends well with other citrus oils, especially neroli, and spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove. Tangerine oil is an orange mobile liquid with a fresh, sweet, orangelike aroma. It has less body than mandarin and is little used in perfumery work.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Possibly phototoxic, although it has not been demonstrated decisively.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, congested and oily skin, scars, spots, stretch marks, toner.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Fluid retention, obesity.
  • Digestive System: Digestive problems, dyspepsia, hiccoughs, intestinal problems.
  • Nervous System: Insomnia, nervous tension, restlessness. It is often used for children and pregnant women and is recommended in synergistic combinations with other citrus oils.

Orange Essential Oil

Citrus sinensis

Orange trees are evergreen and grow smaller than bitter orange trees, with less hardy fruit and non-bitter membranes. In addition, the leaf stalks of the sweet Orange are thinner than those of the bitter orange. Oranges are native to China, and are now extensively cultivated in America, primarily in California and Florida. The essential oil is distilled primarily in the Mediterranean and North America, where it is used for both nutrition and to assist with fighting and preventing bacterial and fungal infection

Origin: China and North America
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

In Chinese medicine the dried sweet orange peel is used to treat coughs, colds, anorexia and malignant breast sores.

Properties

Antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, bactericidal, carminative, choleretic, digestive, fungicidal, hypotensive, sedative (nervous), stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A yellowy-orange or dark orange mobile liquid with a sweet, fresh-fruity scent, richer than the distilled oil. It blends well with lavender, neroli, lemon, clary sage, myrrh and spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove.

Safety information

Possibly hypoallergenic in some users. Do not use internally or in young children or while pregnant.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Dull and oily complexions, mouth ulcers.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Obesity, palpitations, water retention.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Bronchitis, chills.
  • Digestive System: Constipation, dyspepsia, spasm.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension and stress-related conditions.

Peppermint Essential Oil

Mentha piperita

Peppermint is one of the few “hybrid” plants that has become a staple in our society - it’s a crossbreed of two plants: Mentha viridis and Mentha aquatica! The plant itself has green serrated leaves and purple to reddish-violet stems and flowers. It stands up to 1 meter high and has a root system that’s equally large. Historically, Peppermint has been used by cultures spanning the globe for indigestion, nausea, sore throat, diarrhea, headaches, toothaches, and cramps - as well as several other remedies!

Origin: India
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaf

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

It is purported that mint has been cultivated for thousands of years, as far back as Ancient China and Japan, as well as Ancient Egypt - in which those cultures often used mint for a variety of ailments including indigestion, cold, and headaches.

Properties

Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiphlogistic, antipruritic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor, vermifuge.

Characteristics

Peppermint essential oil is pale yellow or green in color with a very strong and penetrating grassy/minty odor. It blends very well with rosemary, lavender, marjoram, lemon, eucalyptus, and other mint oils.

Safety information

Peppermint oil is virtually non-toxic and non-irritant, however, it can cause sensitivities on the skin if used dermally and in concentration form.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Peppermint oil has been used for acne, dermatitis, ringworm, and aching teeth and gums.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Commonly employed to combat the pain associated with arthritis and neuralgia.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Can be very effective as an expectorant - relieving congestion associated with asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis, spasmodic cough, and other head cold related symptoms.
  • Digestive Issues: Arguably the most effective use of Peppermint essential oil, it can help to rid the stomach of cramps, flatulence, and nausea.
  • Immune System: Helps fight the symptoms of Colds, ‘flu, and fevers.
  • Nervous System: Can assist in addressing headaches, mental fatigue, migraine, nervous stress, and vertigo.

Petitgrain Essential Oil

Citrus aurantium var. amara

Petitgrain is a unique essential oil, in that it is sourced and derived from the same plant as other oils, but from different parts of the plant that contains a different chemical constituency. The tree in question is the same species that the Bitter Orange grows on, but Petitgrain comes from the leaves and twigs, rather than the fruit of the tree. Because it comes from the leaves and twigs of the same tree, much of the effects are similar to other citrus oils, but there are some stark differences, particularly in regards to digestion.

Origin: Southern China and Northeastern India
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves and Twigs

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

At one time the oil used to be extracted from the green unripe oranges when they were still the size of a cherry – hence the name petitgrain or ‘little grains’. One of the classic ingredients of eau-de-cologne.

Properties

Antiseptic, antispasmodic, deodorant, digestive, nervine, stimulant (digestive, nervous), stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A pale yellow to amber liquid with a fresh-floral citrus scent and a woody- herbaceous undertone. It blends well with rosemary, lavender, geranium, bergamot, bitter orange, orange blossom, labdanum, oakmoss, clary sage, jasmine, benzoin, palmarosa, clove and balsams.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing, non-phototoxic.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, excessive perspiration, greasy skin and hair, toning.
  • Digestive System: Dyspepsia, flatulence.
  • Nervous System: Convalescence, insomnia, nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions.

Rosemary Essential Oil

Rosmarinus officinalis

Rosemary is an extremely aromatic plant that grows very tall and is evergreen - meaning it does not have large leaves, rather, needle-like leaves that it does not shed at the end of the growing season. In addition to the green leaves, the plant also has an arrangement of pale-blue flowers. Although, historically, Rosemary was used for “magical” practices, it’s supposedly also one of the plants used as food, medicine, and magic, as opposed to one of those uses. Often, it was (and still is) applied for respiratory concerns and illnesses, as well as muscle and joint pain, in addition to its many other remedies.

Origin: Spain
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Plant

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Rosemary is arguably the first plant to have been used for food, medicine, and magic - as it was widely regarded as sacred in many civilizations. In these ancient cultures, Rosemary was burned and fumigated to rid shrines and villages of evil spirits and plagues. As time moved forward, practical use increased, and Rosemary began to be used more in addressing the symptoms of illnesses like colds, congestion, ‘flu, digestive issues, rheumatic pain, and skin issues.

Properties

Analgesic, antimicrobial, anti-oxidant, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, choleretic, cicatrisant, cordial, cytophylactic, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, fungicidal, hepatic, hypertensive, nervine, parasiticide, restorative, rubefacient, stimulant (circulatory, adrenal cortex, hepatobiliary), stomachic, sudorific, tonic (nervous, general), vulnerary.

Characteristics

Rosemary essential oil is a colorless or pale yellow liquid with a strong, fresh, and herbaceous overtone, with a pleasant undertone of woody-balsamic mint. Because of its broad profile, Rosemary blends well with many other oils, including lavender, citronella, oregano, thyme, peppermint, and other spice oils.

Safety information

Rosemary is non-toxic, non-irritant, and non-sensitizing. However, it is advised to avoid use during pregnancy, and avoid use altogether if you have epilepsy.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Rosemary essential oil has vast uses on the skin including reducing acne, dandruff, dermatitis, eczema, and lice - and can assist with seborrhea, scabies, varicose veins, and greasy hair.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Can be a wonderful remedy to pain caused by arteriosclerosis, rheumatism, poor circulation, and gout, as well as muscle pain.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Has been used extensively in combating asthma, bronchitis, and whooping cough.
  • Digestive Issues: It’s herbaceous and minty qualities make it a wonderful potential remedy for flatulence, cramps, and other digestive conditions including colitis, dyspepsia, hypercholesterolaemia, and jaundice.
  • Immune System: Can fight the symptoms of colds, ‘flu, and other infections.
  • Nervous System: Often employed to fight the symptoms of headaches, hypertension, neuralgia, mental fatigue, nervous exhaustion, and other stress-related disorders.

Sage Essential Oil

Salvia lavendulaefolia

Sage is an evergreen shrub that is very similar to spike lavender - it grows in the mountains of Spain and in Southwest France, and has narrow leaves and small purple flowers. The entire plant is heavily aromatic, and in Spain, it’s actually regarded as the essential oil to use for just about any condition.

Origin: Spain
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

In Spain it is regarded as something of a ‘cure-all’. Believed to promote longevity and protect against all types of infection (such as plague). Used to treat rheumatism, digestive complaints, menstrual problems, infertility and nervous weakness.

Properties

Antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, deodorant, depurative, digestive, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hypotensive, nervine, regulator (of seborrhoea), stimulant (hepatobiliary, adrenocortical glands, circulation), stomachic, tonic (nerve and general).

Characteristics

A pale yellow mobile liquid with a fresh-herbaceous, camphoraceous, slightly pinelike odour. It blends well with rosemary, lavandin, lavender, pine, citronella, eucalyptus, juniper, clary sage and cedarwood.

Safety information

Relatively non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Avoid during pregnancy; use in moderation.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, cuts, dandruff, dermatitis, eczema, excessive sweating, hair loss, gingivitis, gum infections, sores.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, debility, fluid retention, muscular aches and pains, poor circulation, rheumatism.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, coughs, laryngitis.
  • Digestive System: Jaundice, liver congestion.
  • Immune System: Colds, fevers, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Headaches, nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions.

Sweet Marjoram Essential Oil

Origanum majorana

Sweet Marjoram is from the Genus Origanum, technically making it a part of the same family of plants as Oregano, although it is not the same Oregano that you may be used to (Origanum onites). Oddly enough, in the time it’s taken to establish a confusing relationship between Sweet Marjoram and other species of Oregano, it has been one of the most common traditional herbs used in Greek culture, dating back to ancient Greece. The word Oregano translates to “Joy of the Mountains” in Greek, which explains a bit more about the confusing name situation. However, none of that is to detract from the amazing uses for Sweet Marjoram, as it is commonly employed to reduce pain in many ways, extending from headaches to muscle and joint stiffness.

Origin: Egypt
Method: Steamed Distillation
Plant Part: Flowers

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

A highly versatile herb, Sweet Marjoram has been used in both cooking and folk remedies since the times of Ancient Greece, particularly for muscle and joint pain, respiratory issues, immune system deficiencies, and digestive concerns.

Properties

Analgesic, anaphrodisiac, anti-oxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, bactericidal, carminative, cephalic, cordial, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, fungicidal, hypotensive, laxative, nervine, sedative, stomachic, tonic, vasodilator, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Sweet Marjoram essential oil is pale yellow or amber colored and has a warm, woody, and camphoraceous odor. It blends very well with lavender, rosemary, bergamot, chamomile, tea tree, and eucalyptus.

Safety information

Sweet Marjoram essential oil is virtually non-toxic, but it is recommended to suspend usage while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Helpful in reducing pain from bruising and effective in repelling insects.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Used frequently to address arthritis, muscular aches and stiffness, rheumatism, sprains, and strains.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Commonly used to combat asthma, bronchitis, and cough.
  • Digestive Issues: Can be employed to relieve digestive problems including constipation, dyspepsia, and flatulence.
  • Immune System: Powerful in combating the symptoms of cold.
  • Nervous System: Can relieve pain related to headache, hypertension, migraine, nervous tension, and can assist in combating insomnia and other stress-related conditions.

Tea Tree Essential Oil

Melaleuca alternifolia

Tea Tree is a small tree (closer to a shrub than a tree) with needle-shaped leaves and heads of yellow or purplish flowers. Tea Tree is native to Australia, and although other varieties have been cultivated elsewhere, Melaleuca alternifolia is cultivated exclusively in Australia, primarily in New South Wales. Tea Tree was used extensively by the Aboriginal peoples of Australia in teas (hence, the name) and has been tested more recently to reveal that it can be used effectively in combating all three major varieties of infectious organisms: bacteria, fungi, and virus. This is due to its properties as an immunostimulant, in that it effectively boosts immune system response to infectious disease like colds, ‘flu, and others.

Origin: Australia
Method: Steamed Distillation
Plant Part: Leaf-Branch

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Commonly used by the indigenous aboriginal tribes of Australia, Tea Tree has been cultivated for hundreds of years and has been used as a remedy for a variety of immune-system related conditions. Because it is an immunostimulant, it’s been used to boost the response time and effectiveness of the immune system in fighting the symptoms of bacterial, fungal, and viral infections alike.

Properties

Anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antiviral, bactericidal, balsamic, cicatrisant, diaphoretic, expectorant, fungicidal, immuno-stimulant, parasiticide, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Tea Tree essential oil is pale yellow to pale green-white in color and has a warm, fresh, and spicy overtone, with a mildly camphoraceous undertone. Tea Tree is a great inclusion in any blend, as it combines wonderfully with lavender, clary sage, rosemary, geranium, marjoram, and other herbaceous and spicy oils.

Safety information

Tea Tree oil can cause sensitivity on the skin of some consumers, but is otherwise non-toxic and non-irritant.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Used in addressing acne, athlete’s foot, blisters, burns, cold sores, dandruff, insect bites, rashes, spots, warts, and infected flesh wounds.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, bronchitis, coughs, sinusitis, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.
  • Immune System: Colds, ‘flu, fever, chickenpox, other infectious illnesses

Thyme Essential Oil

Thymus satureioides

Thyme is an evergreen perennial shrub that grows up to 45 cm in height. It has a woody root system and small elliptical greenish-grey leaves - with this particular species being native to Morocco. Thyme is extremely popular in the kitchen, and for thousands of years the stems and leaves were used in tandem with prayer, ceremony, and the court system. Today, Thyme is used often to fight infection and as a tonic.

Origin: Morocco
Method: Steamed Distillation
Plant Part: Leaves

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Thyme is derived from the Greek word thymos that means 'perfume'. It was used in herbal medicines by the ancient Greeks, Egyptians and Romans, as incense in Greek temples, and in embalming by the Egyptians. During the Middle Ages it was given to jousting knights for courage, and a sprig of thyme was later carried into courtrooms to ward off diseases

Properties

Positivant, anti-infectious, immunomodulant, general tonic, uterotonic, anti-asthenic, aphrodisiac.

Characteristics

Clear liquid with a yellow-orange color and a powerful and typical aroma. Strong and spicy.

Safety information

May cause skin irritation in some individuals; a skin test is recommended prior to use. Contact with eyes should be avoided, and must be diluted well before use.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Astringent, sores.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, muscular aches and stiffness, rheumatism, sprains, strains.
  • Immune System: Colds.
  • Nervous System: Headache, migraine, nervous tension and stress-related conditions.

Turmeric Essential Oil

Curcuma longa

Turmeric is a perennial tropical herb that grows to nearly a meter high and has a thick root with a deep-orange composition and soft yellow flowers. It is native to Southern Asia, namely India, China, and Indonesia, and is closely related to Ginger. It’s used primarily as a spice in curry and other dishes from that region, but is also used as a home remedy in much of those same areas of the world.

Origin: Southern Asia
Method: Steamed Distillation
Plant Part: Root

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil

Historical/Traditional Uses

A common household spice, especially for curry powder. It is high in minerals and vitamins, especially vitamin C. It is also used extensively as a local home medicine. In Chinese herbalism it is used for bruises, sores, ringworm, toothache, chest pains, colic and menstrual problems, usually in combination with remedies. It was once used as a cure for jaundice.

Properties

Analgesic, anti-arthritic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, bactericidal, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, hypotensive, insecticidal, laxative, rubefacient, stimulant.

Characteristics

A yellowy-orange liquid with a faint blue fluorescence and a fresh spicy-woody odour. It blends well with cananga, labdanum, elecampane, ginger, orris, cassie, clary sage and mimosa.

Safety information

The ketone ‘tumerone’ is moderately toxic and irritant in high concentration. Possible sensitization problems.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, muscular aches and pains, rheumatism.
  • Digestive System: Sluggish digestion, liver congestion.

Ylang Ylang Essential Oil

Cananga odorata var. genuina

Ylang Ylang, aside from being the hardest to say, is one of the most versatile essential oils in the entire world. It’s been used in tropical Asian culture for many years for both symbolism and medicinal remedies, dating back to before the Victorian era. Ylang Ylang is an aphrodisiac as well, adding to its historic symbolism, but it’s also a commonly used antidepressant, sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, tonic, and euphoric supplement. The tree itself grows very tall, up to 20 meters, and has beautiful flowering leaves from which the essential oil is extracted.

Origin: Madagascar
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowers

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Historically, Ylang Ylang has been used as a piece of symbolism in marriage ceremonies, but it’s also been used as a symptomatic remedy for a variety of conditions like depression, anxiety, colds, ‘flu, and other infections inside and out.

Properties

Aphrodisiac, antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiseborrhoeic, antiseptic, euphoric, hypotensive, nervine, regulator, sedative (nervous), stimulant (circulatory), tonic.

Characteristics

Ylang Ylang essential oil is pale yellow in color, with a far more oily texture than other oils. The scent is tantalizingly sweet, soft, and floral, while the undertones are slightly spicy. While it’s an awesome perfume in its own right, it combines wonderfully with jasmine, bergamot, rose, and many other oils like lavender and frankincense.

Safety information

Due to its strong scent, use Ylang Ylang sparingly to avoid headache or nausea, otherwise, Ylang Ylang is entirely non-toxic and non-irritant.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, insect bites, irritated skin, and other general skin care practice.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Can increase circulation to the muscles and joints, relieving pain.
  • Nervous System: Can be very effective in fighting depression, impotence, insomnia, nervous tension, and other nervous system disorders.