Corked Portable Aromatherapy Diffusers - Alive

tranquil

portable diffuser

Below are the ingridents used in our tranquil blend! Each one of them plays an important role in the recipe.

Bergamot Essential Oil

Citrus bergamia

Bergamot is commonly grown in Italy and Northwestern Africa, and is used for a variety of skin and respiratory conditions. In addition, Bergamot can be applied for indigestion, infections, respiratory conditions, and anxiety/depression. Bergamot essential oil can be effective through dermal application, as well as diffusion and aromatics.

Origin: Italy
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Bergamot has been used in Italian folk medicine for many years, and is named after the city of Bergamo. Italians had traditionally used it to curb fever and worms, but its usage has expanded and is now applied for a variety of conditions and symptoms.

Properties

Analgesic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, antiseptic (pulmonary, genito-urinary), antispasmodic, antitoxic, carminative, digestive, diuretic, deodorant, febrifuge, laxative, parasiticide, rubefacient, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

Bergamot essential oil appears light green to yellow and has a fresh and citrusy scent, much like other citrus fruit oils. The undertones of the scent are far more reminiscent of woody and earthy tones than the initial overtones, which makes it great to combine with oils like lavender, jasmine, geranium, lemon, and chamomile.

Safety information

Some of the constituents of Bergamot can be phototoxic, meaning they can cause for irritation or sensitivity of your skin when it comes in contact with sunlight. Consumers should be careful to use limited quantities when applying Bergamot dermally, and should contact a physician prior to use if they have any questions or concerns regarding their own experience.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Can be used to combat a variety of skin conditions including acne and insect bites.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Can assist in relieving a sore throat or symptoms of tonsillitis.
  • Digestive Issues: Can limit flatulence and can increase appetite.
  • Immune System: Can help to boost the immune system in fighting colds, fever, flu, and other infections.
  • Nervous System: Commonly applied to help ease anxiety, depression, and stress as well as uplift mood and mental stimulation.

Chamomile Essential Oil

Matricaria recutita

Chamomile is an annual herb with a very strong scent that grows up to 60 cms in height and has delicate leaves and simple white flowers on single stems. It’s native to Europe and North and West Asia, but has been naturalized in North America and Australia. Although there are many species and varieties of Chamomile, the chemical constituency remains nearly identical, and each is used frequently for a variety of ailments and concerns.

Origin: Nepal
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowers

Used in: Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

This herb has a long-standing medicinal tradition, especially in Europe for ‘all states of tension and the visceral symptoms that can arise therefrom, such as nervous dyspepsia and nervous bowel, tension headaches, and sleeplessness.

Properties

Analgesic, anti-allergenic, anti-inflammatory, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, cholagogue, digestive, emmenagogue, febrifuge, fungicidal, hepatic, nerve sedative, stimulant of leucocyte production, stomachic, sudorific, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Characteristics

An inky-blue viscous liquid with a strong, sweetish warm-herbaceous odour. It blends well with geranium, lavender, patchouli, rose, benzoin, neroli, bergamot, marjoram, lemon, ylang ylang, jasmine, clary sage and labdanum.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant; causes dermatitis in some individuals.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, allergies, boils, burns, cuts, chilblains, dermatitis, earache, eczema, hair care, inflammations, insect bites, rashes, sensitive skin, teething pain, toothache, wounds.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Arthritis, inflamed joints, muscular pain, neuralgia, rheumatism, sprains.
  • Digestive System: Dyspepsia, colic, indigestion, nausea.
  • Nervous System: Headache, insomnia, nervous tension, migraine and stress-related complaints.

Clary Sage Essential Oil

Salvia sclarea

Clary Sage is a large perennial herb that grows up to a meter high with large and hairy leaves. The leaves grow with a greenish-purple hue and it sprouts small blue flowers. Clary Sage is native to Europe, but now grows extensively around the world, particularly in the Mediterranean region. Clary Sage is used frequently to assist with things like digestive issues, menstruation, depression, anxiety, muscle and joint pain, and on the skin.

Origin: Southern Europe
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Leaves and Flowers

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

It was used for digestive disorders, kidney disease, uterine and menstrual complaints, for cleansing ulcers and as a general nerve tonic.

Properties

Anthelmintic, antidiarrhoeal, antidote (to poison), antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anti-putrescent, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, digestive, emmenagogue, haemostatic, orexigenic, parasiticide, refrigerant, spasmolytic, stimulant (circulatory, cardiac, respiratory), stomachic, and vermifuge.

Characteristics

A colourless or pale yellowy-green liquid with a sweet, nutty-herbaceous scent. It blends well with juniper, lavender, coriander, cardomon, geranium, sandalwood, cedarwood, pine, labdanum, jasmine, frankincense, bergamot and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Avoid during pregnancy. Do not use clary sage oil while drinking alcohol since it can induce a narcotic effect and exaggerate drunkenness. Clary sage is generally used in preference to the garden sage in aromatherapy due to its lower toxicity level.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, boils, dandruff, hair loss, inflamed conditions, oily skin and hair, ophthalmia, ulcers, wrinkles.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: High blood pressure, muscular aches and pains.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, throat infections, whooping cough.
  • Digestive System: Colic, cramp, dyspepsia, flatulence.
  • Nervous System: Depression, frigidity, impotence, migraine, nervous tension and stress-related disorders.

Frankincense Essential Oil

Boswellia carteri

Frankincense is arguably the most powerful essential oil on Earth, and although that claim is subjective, it really is an amazing natural substance that anyone can benefit from. Frankincense is harvested from the oleoresin that leaks from incisions in the bark of the Boswellia tree. Native to Northern and Eastern Africa, the Boswellia’s oleoresin is harvested and from there transported to regions like Europe and India to be distilled into essential oil.

Origin: Northern Africa
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Oleoresin

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

Used since antiquity as an incense in India, China and in the west by the Catholic Church. In ancient Egypt it was used in rejuvenating face masks, cosmetics and perfumes. It has been used medicinally in the east and west for a wide range of conditions including syphilis, rheumatism, respiratory and urinary tract infections, skin diseases, as well as digestive and nervous complaints.

Properties

Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, cytophylactic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, sedative, tonic, uterine, vulnerary.

Characteristics

A pale yellow or greenish mobile liquid with a fresh, terpeney top note and a warm, rich, sweet-balsamic undertone. It blends well with sandalwood, pine, vetiver, geranium, lavender, mimosa, neroli, orange, bergamot, camphor, basil, pepper, cinnamon and other spices. It modifies the sweetness of citrus blends in an intriguing way.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Blemishes, dry and mature complexions, scars, wounds, wrinkles.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, coughs, laryngitis.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Anxiety, nervous tension and stress-related conditions

Jasmine Essential Oil

Jasminum grandiflorum

Jasmine essential oil is arguably the most valuable essential oil on the planet, and for good reason. Not only is it rare, but it’s extremely difficult and laborious to make. Regardless, the demand stays high for Jasmine due to its extensive use in perfumery and aromatherapy. Jasmine is an evergreen vine or shrub, native to the Mediterranean and North Africa, that grows up to 10 meters high with bright green leaves and delicate, star-shaped flowers and a strong and pleasant odor.

Origin: Egypt
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Absolute

Used in: Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

In China, the flowers of J. officinale var. grandiflorum are used to treat hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and dysentery; the flowers are used for conjunctivitis, dysentery, skin ulcers and tumours. The root is used to treat headaches, insomnia, pain due to dislocated joints and rheumatism.

Properties

Analgesic (mild), antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cicatrisant, expectorant, galactagogue, parturient, sedative, tonic (uterine).

Characteristics

The absolute is a dark orange-brown, viscous liquid with an intensely rich, warm, floral scent and a tealike undertone. It blends well with rose, sandalwood, clary sage, and all citrus oils. It has the ability to round off any rough notes and blend with virtually everything.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, generally non-sensitizing. (An allergic reaction has been known to occur in some individuals.)

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Dry, greasy, irritated, sensitive skin.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Muscular spasm, sprains.
  • Respiratory System: Catarrh, coughs, hoarseness, laryngitis.
  • Nervous System: Depression, nervous exhaustion and stress-related conditions.

Lemon Essential Oil

Citrus limon

The Lemon is one of the most widely recognizable citrus fruits in the world, with its notable yellow color and oblong shape, the sharp and sour juice and peel are applied commonly for a variety of conditions. Lemons can be found growing across the world, although its origins are in Asia, likely East India. The primary locations for cultivation today are in the Mediterranean region and South and North America. When life hands you lemons, you don’t just make lemonade, you use it for all of its amazing properties, too!

Origin: Italy
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Tranquil

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Historical/Traditional Uses

Lemon peel has been used in folk tradition and the culinary world as a flavoring for hundreds of years. Upon the discovery of its vast nutritional attributes (high content of Vitamins A, B, and C) it became even more popular and was used as a sort-of “cure-all” for symptoms of infection like fever or scurvy. When taken internally, Lemon juice is very effective in addressing acidic conditions like arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Properties

Anti-anaemic, antimicrobial, antirheumatic, antisclerotic, antiscorbutic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitoxic, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic, febrifuge, haemostatic, hypotensive, insecticidal, rubefacient, stimulates white corpuscles, tonic, vermifuge.

Characteristics

Lemon essential oil begins as a pale green-yellow liquid, and begins to brown with aging. It has a very light, sharp, and citrus scent - making it perfect for blending with oils like Lavender, Ylang Ylang, Rose, Sandalwood, Chamomile, Geranium, Eucalyptus, and other citrus oils.

Safety information

Internally, Lemon essential oil is non-toxic. However, external use can lead to sensitivities and Lemon essential oil is phototoxic, so it should not be applied dermally in areas that will be exposed to direct sunlight.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Can be used or applied to the skin (in low volumes, and in a carrier oil) to address symptoms of acne, anaemia, brittle nails, boils, cuts, greasy skin, insect bites, mouth ulcers, spots, varicose veins, and warts.
  • Muscle and Joint Care: Lemon essential oil is often used by people looking to relieve pain from arthritis, nosebleeds, obesity, poor circulation, and rheumatism.

Mandarin Essential Oil

Citrus reticulata

Mandarin oranges have an interesting history that contributes to much of their current notoriety. Native to southern China and the Far East, Mandarin oranges were brought to Europe in 1805 and to America forty years later, where they were renamed the tangerine. The Mandarin is produced mainly in Italy, Spain, Algeria, Cyprus, Greece, the Middle East and Brazil; the tangerine in Texas, Florida, California and Guinea. They are widely used in ancient medicinal practice, and contain many of the same chemical properties as a variety of other citrus fruits.

Origin: Far-Eastern Asia and China
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Refresh | Refresh Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

The name comes from the fruit which was a traditional gift to the Mandarins of China. In France it is regarded as a safe children’s remedy for indigestion, hiccoughs, etc, and also for the elderly since it helps strengthen the digestive function and liver.

Properties

Antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, digestive, diuretic (mild), laxative (mild), sedative, stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), tonic.

Characteristics

Mandarin oil is a yellowy-orange mobile liquid with a blue-violet hint, having an intensely sweet, almost floral citrus scent. It blends well with other citrus oils, especially neroli, and spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove. Tangerine oil is an orange mobile liquid with a fresh, sweet, orangelike aroma. It has less body than mandarin and is little used in perfumery work.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing. Possibly phototoxic, although it has not been demonstrated decisively.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, congested and oily skin, scars, spots, stretch marks, toner.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Fluid retention, obesity.
  • Digestive System: Digestive problems, dyspepsia, hiccoughs, intestinal problems.
  • Nervous System: Insomnia, nervous tension, restlessness. It is often used for children and pregnant women and is recommended in synergistic combinations with other citrus oils.

Orange Essential Oil

Citrus sinensis

Orange trees are evergreen and grow smaller than bitter orange trees, with less hardy fruit and non-bitter membranes. In addition, the leaf stalks of the sweet Orange are thinner than those of the bitter orange. Oranges are native to China, and are now extensively cultivated in America, primarily in California and Florida. The essential oil is distilled primarily in the Mediterranean and North America, where it is used for both nutrition and to assist with fighting and preventing bacterial and fungal infection

Origin: China and North America
Method: Cold Pressed
Plant Part: Peel

Used in: Ecstacy | Ecstacy Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

In Chinese medicine the dried sweet orange peel is used to treat coughs, colds, anorexia and malignant breast sores.

Properties

Antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, bactericidal, carminative, choleretic, digestive, fungicidal, hypotensive, sedative (nervous), stimulant (digestive and lymphatic), stomachic, tonic.

Characteristics

A yellowy-orange or dark orange mobile liquid with a sweet, fresh-fruity scent, richer than the distilled oil. It blends well with lavender, neroli, lemon, clary sage, myrrh and spice oils such as nutmeg, cinnamon and clove.

Safety information

Possibly hypoallergenic in some users. Do not use internally or in young children or while pregnant.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Dull and oily complexions, mouth ulcers.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Obesity, palpitations, water retention.
  • Respiratory Conditions: Bronchitis, chills.
  • Digestive System: Constipation, dyspepsia, spasm.
  • Immune System: Colds, ’flu.
  • Nervous System: Nervous tension and stress-related conditions.

Sandalwood Essential Oil

Santalum spicatum

Sandalwood is an evergreen tree that is small in stature and is parasitic in nature. It grows up to 9 meters high and features many smooth and slender branches, while its leaves are leathery and the buds grow into small purplish-pink flowers. Interestingly, the Sandalwood tree must be at least 30 years old in order for some of the wood to be harvested for Sandalwood oil. The final product, the oil, is used extensively in many cultures as it has been for over 4000 years.

Origin: Australia
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Wood

Used in: Tranquil

Historical/Traditional Uses

One of the oldest known perfume materials, with at least 4000 years of uninterrupted use. It is used as a traditional incense, as a cosmetic, perfume and embalming material all over the East. It is also a popular building material, especially for temples. In Chinese medicine it is used to treat stomach ache, vomiting, gonorrhoea, choleraic difficulties and skin complaints. In the Ayurvedic tradition it is used mainly for urinary and respiratory infections, or acute and chronic diarrhoea.

Properties

Antidepressant, antiphlogistic, antiseptic (urinary and pulmonary), antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, astringent, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrisant, diuretic, expectorant, fungicidal, insecticidal, sedative, tonic.

Characteristics

A pale yellow, greenish or brownish viscous liquid with a deep, soft, sweet-woody balsamic scent of excellent tenacity. It blends well with rose, violet, tuberose, clove, lavender, black pepper, bergamot, rosewood, geranium, labdanum, oakmoss, benzoin, vetiver, patchouli, mimosa, cassie, costus, myrrh and jasmine.

Safety information

Non-toxic, non-irritant, non-sensitizing.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, dry, cracked and chapped skin, aftershave (barber’s rash), greasy skin, moisturizer.
  • Respiratory System: Bronchitis, catarrh, coughs (dry, persistent), laryngitis, sore throat.
  • Digestive System: Diarrhoea, nausea.
  • Nervous System: Depression, insomnia, nervous tension and stress-related complaints.

Vegetable Glycerin

Vegetable Glycerin, also known as glycerol, is essentially an organic simple syrup made using the triglycerides of plants. Several different organisms can be used to create Vegetable Glycerin, and in our case we use a Soy-based product. It is used often in the culinary world as a sweetening agent as well as in the pharmaceutical world as a carrying agent for different liquid medications. While it’s uses are abundant, we use Vegetable Glycerin as the carrying liquid for our essential oils in our Portable Aromatherapy Diffusers in order to make certain that the oils do not burn and are not adulterated by the heating element in the device.

Ylang Ylang Essential Oil

Cananga odorata var. genuina

Ylang Ylang, aside from being the hardest to say, is one of the most versatile essential oils in the entire world. It’s been used in tropical Asian culture for many years for both symbolism and medicinal remedies, dating back to before the Victorian era. Ylang Ylang is an aphrodisiac as well, adding to its historic symbolism, but it’s also a commonly used antidepressant, sedative, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, tonic, and euphoric supplement. The tree itself grows very tall, up to 20 meters, and has beautiful flowering leaves from which the essential oil is extracted.

Origin: Madagascar
Method: Steam Distilled
Plant Part: Flowers

Used in: Alive | Alive Essential Oil | Meditate | Meditate Essential Oil | Trance | Trance Essential Oil | Tranquil

Click here to view product.

Historical/Traditional Uses

Historically, Ylang Ylang has been used as a piece of symbolism in marriage ceremonies, but it’s also been used as a symptomatic remedy for a variety of conditions like depression, anxiety, colds, ‘flu, and other infections inside and out.

Properties

Aphrodisiac, antidepressant, anti-infectious, antiseborrhoeic, antiseptic, euphoric, hypotensive, nervine, regulator, sedative (nervous), stimulant (circulatory), tonic.

Characteristics

Ylang Ylang essential oil is pale yellow in color, with a far more oily texture than other oils. The scent is tantalizingly sweet, soft, and floral, while the undertones are slightly spicy. While it’s an awesome perfume in its own right, it combines wonderfully with jasmine, bergamot, rose, and many other oils like lavender and frankincense.

Safety information

Due to its strong scent, use Ylang Ylang sparingly to avoid headache or nausea, otherwise, Ylang Ylang is entirely non-toxic and non-irritant.

Therapeutic Uses

  • Skin Care: Acne, insect bites, irritated skin, and other general skin care practice.
  • Muscle and Joint Pain: Can increase circulation to the muscles and joints, relieving pain.
  • Nervous System: Can be very effective in fighting depression, impotence, insomnia, nervous tension, and other nervous system disorders.